Suzuki DR-Z400 Street Tracker by LBC Motorcycles

Suzuki DRZ400 Tracker

The “Full Aluminum Flat Tracker” from Argentina…

The Suzuki DR-Z400, introduced in 2000, has become one of the most popular middleweight dual-sports in the world. The Australian Army uses a slightly modified version for their operations, while commuters appreciate the bike’s ability to jump curbs and dart through urban gridlock. The main criticism of the liquid-cooled, 39-hp thumper has been the 319-lb wet weight. Says MCN of the machine:

“The Suzuki DR-Z400S is a bit heavy for true off-roading but greenlaners love it for its indefatigable charm.”

Suzuki DRZ400 Tracker

Enter Juan Taurel of Low Budget Customs — aka LBC Motorcycles — based in Buenos Aires, Argentina. When a customer, Ramón, gave the LBC crew free reign to customize his 2012 DR-Z400, Juan knew it was the perfect platform for a project he’d had in mind for a long time:

“I was in love with the idea of a super light, full aluminum Flat Tracker.”

Whereas Juan and the team transform many bikes into tracker-style builds, they decided to make this DRZ tracker perform as well as on the track as the street — a bike ready to race on Sundays and work on Mondays. Says Juan:

“My perfect kind of bike, if you ask me.”

Below, we get the full story on this “Full Aluminum Flat Tracker.”

DR-Z400 Street (Flat) Tracker: Builder Interview

Suzuki DRZ400 Tracker

• Please tell us a bit about yourself, your history with motorcycles, and your workshop.

Born and raised in Buenos Aires, Argentina. I was always passionate about old bikes and one day in 2012 I opened the garage with a couple of friends and started to modify new bikes to look like old bikes and one thing leads to another until today, when we have modified more than 350 motorcycles at LBC Motorcycles.

• What’s the make, model, and year of the bike?

Suzuki DRZ400, 2012.

• Why was this bike built?

This project was made for a customer, but very personal too. Ramón came to the shop with the DRZ and tell to me: “Do whatever you want. I trust 100% in your taste.”

The thing was that I was in love with the idea of a super light full aluminum Flat Tracker since a long time, so when the DRZ arrived I knew that was the perfect bike for that project.

Suzuki DRZ400 Tracker

• What was the design concept and what influenced the build?

We customize lots of bikes in LBC that look like a Flat Tracker racing bike, but they are all just an appearance to use on the street. The idea with the DRZ was to make a bike that not only looks like a real racing flat tracker, but also has the lightness, the power and the correct wheels. So, we can say this bike is our first Tracker ready to race on Sundays and to go work during the week. My perfect kind of bike, if you ask me.

Suzuki DRZ400 Tracker

• What custom work was done to the bike?

We replaced the original 18″ and 21″ wheels with two 19″ Excel and Shinko Flat Track tires. The angle of the sub-chassis was modified slightly to give it a more parallel line to the floor. We build the gas tank and seat in aluminum to lower the weight as much as possible. We build the stainless steel exhaust pipe and link a Yoshimura. LED lights forward and back to use it in the streets. Front suspension modified and we put a lithium battery, Pro Taper handlebar, UNI air filter and improve the carburetion.

Possibly she receives a nice painting design soon.

Suzuki DRZ400 Tracker

 

• Does the bike have a nickname?

Not really, is just a “Full Aluminium Flat Tracker.”

• How would you classify this bike?

Street (Flat) Tracker.

Follow the Builder

Concept Design: Juan Taurel (@jtaurel)

Builders: Juan Taurel, Hernan Alco, Luciano Gimenez.

Instagram: @lowbudgetcustoms

Facebook: Low Budget Customs

Website: www.lbcmoto.com

2 Comments

  1. Michael Ritzker

    Yes, very nice indeed, but we are not told how much it actually weighs, kind of disappointing after the preamble if you ask me.

  2. Amazing bike. This is very close to what I would consider my perfect bike! It says the front suspension was modified … I assume lowered. Did they have to change the rear shock to get it this low?

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