Road Racer: Stoker S-RR by Stoker Motorcycles

Stoker S-RR

The Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6RR was a limited-production homologation special based on the company’s 636cc middleweight, the ZX-6R. Both machines featured new aerodynamic bodywork, ram induction, and a GP-style swingarm, but the track-oriented RR added an adjustable swingarm pivot, ramp-type slipper clutch, and a 599cc, 118-hp engine that met the displacement limit for supersport racing.

Enter Antti Eloheimo of Finland’s Stoker Motorcycles, whose love of fast bikes can be traced back to his first ride with his father:

“The sheer fear mixed with excitement induced by the acceleration and trees rushing by in my peripheral vision left a permanent burn in my heart towards fast bikes.”

Stoker S-RR

Antti studied industrial and automotive design in school, but a career in the digital world left him an itch to work with his hands. When an accident left him with a broken neck, a doctor’s ban from the racetrack, and a wrecked ZX-6RR race bike, he set out to build a retro futuristic custom — one that would “look fast enough to win TT races.” He says of the design:

“This ‘fantasy’ racer is a design study/concept which combines vintage aesthetic cues of 60’s Le Mans race cars, old race bikes and jet planes.”

Stoker S-RR

Working out of his small home garage during the cold Finnish winters, he designed and built everything himself, hand-laying all of the bodywork in glass and carbon fiber. He liked the idea of hiding the original frame and engine, making the underlying donor a mystery to casual viewers, and using curves rarely seen on modern sportbikes:

“It’s…kind of a statement against the modern design trend of superbikes. You don’t always necessarily need angular and faceted design in order to get a fast-looking motorcycle.”

Stoker S-RR

Amen! The number 9 is a tribute to Kawasaki legend Gary Nixon, who would be proud, no doubt, that the Stoker S-RR is not just a showpiece — Antti has done plenty of prototype testing on the track. Asked what he’s most proud of, Antti points to this on-track performance:

“That it works on track and have lap times to prove. The epoxy fairings are so tough that they even survived a minor highside crash last summer.”

Stoker S-RR
Photo: @trackpunkracing

Below, we get the full story on one of the most beautiful modern sportbike customs we’ve ever seen.

Stoker S-RR: Builder Interview

Stoker S-RR

• Please tell us a bit about yourself, your history with motorcycles, and your workshop.

I have always been in love with design and two wheels. I still have a ton of cool sketches (read 6 year old’s doodles) of bikes and cars from when I was really young.

My father and my older half-brothers have always been into bikes. And I still remember like it was yesterday when my dad took me to ride with him. The sheer fear mixed with excitement induced by the acceleration and trees rushing by in my peripheral vision left a permanent burn in my heart towards fast bikes.

I studied industrial design and automotive design, but career focused on digital products as a UX/UI designer still left an itch to realize my own physical designs and make something by hand, be it watches, surfboards or bikes. When me and my wife moved to a house with garage it was obvious that now I had the change to create my own design studio/workshop.

Stoker S-RR

• What’s the make, model, and year of the bike?

It is a former race bike from 2006, that was crashed (ZX-6RR).

• Why was this bike built?

I wanted to start a company and design and build cool stuff. First sketches of the design were done already in 2016, prototype testing on racetracks summer of 2017 and all fabrication in small garage during the winters.

Stoker S-RR

• What was the design concept and what influenced the build?

It’s a design study of a retro futuristic race bike. Vision for this race bike was to do a design study/concept which combines vintage aesthetic cues of 60’s Le Mans race cars, old race bikes, and jet planes, with modern twist.

Stoker S-RR

Design constructs on streamlined silhouette with round nose and strong horizontal line running to the rear like in old café racers. Rear has the silhouette of a KR750 only with hollowed-out design with carbon fin/number plate. The race number 9 of the bike also comes from Kawasaki’s racing heritage from Gary Nixon’s bike. Soft curvy surfaces balanced with few precise lines that flow to one another, and modern aero winglets make the bike look fast enough to win TT races.

Stoker S-RR

One of the ideas was to cover the bike’s frame and other parts so that you wouldn’t immediately recognize what it is built on. It’s also a kind of a statement against the modern design trend of superbikes. You don’t always necessarily need angular and faceted design in order to get a fast-looking motorcycle.

Stoker S-RR

• What custom work was done to the bike?

All bodywork is hand-laid glass fiber and carbon fiber. Engine case covers are also own design. Paint job and graphics, logos etc. are own work.

Stoker S-RR

• Does the bike have a nickname?

Not really, Stoker Motorcycles is the shop name and just named it S-RR (S is for Stoker and RR for Road Racing or ZX6-RR).

Stoker S-RR

• How would you classify this bike?

Race bike.

Stoker S-RR

• Was there anything done during this build that you are particularly proud of?

That it works on track and have lap times to prove. The epoxy fairings are so tough that they even survived a minor highside crash last summer.

Stoker S-RR
Photo: @trackpunkracing

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3 Comments

  1. Wayne Hennebury

    Nice work there, who makes the tack/speedo?

    • Hi Wayne,
      That’s also custom made. Did a mold for the carbon fibre enclosure and CNC milled the dial face. Rewired all the controls to new switches. Actual electronics are stock. By the way it’s not actually race legal since the kill switch is on the dash and not on the handlebars.

  2. This thing is spectacular and refreshing! Thank you, Anti!

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