The One of One: Turbo Dyna by Royal-T Racing

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Alyssa Del Valle

“Imagine if Suzuki made the Hayabusa in the 80’s, what would Harley’s competitor look like?”

That’s the question Patrick Tilbury asked a friend at Sturgis one year, back during their days working for West Coast Choppers. Patrick had gotten into the fabrication game early, welding from the age of 14 in the home garage of his buddy Carlos Sanchez and spending the early days of his career building high-horsepower turbo setups for import cars. Later, he cut his teeth in high-end fabrication and metal-shaping at Austin Speed Shop and West Coast Choppers. Jesse James encouraged Patrick’s side business building FXR/Dyna pipes, which eventually gave birth to Royal-T Racing.

Harley Dyna Turbo
Photo: Alyssa Del Valle

Today, Patrick and the Royal-T Racing crew have a shop in the Upper 9th Ward of New Orleans, in the former office / ER of a speakeasy doctor — an area we know well. And remember that boyhood buddy of Patrick’s, Carlos Sanchez?  He’s now one of Royal-T Racing’s sponsored flat track racers!

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Eddie Del Valle

The turbocharged monster you see here started life as a 2007 H-D Dyna Street Bob, but little more than the neck and VIN remain untouched. The inspiration for the build goes back to that late-night question of a Harley-Davidson rival for the Hayabusa:

“I would say we built because we wanted to see it, if that makes sense. It is definitely a personal project that I have funded 100% out of pocket over the last 4-ish years.”

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Alyssa Del Valle

This Landspeed Dyna is now powered by an S&S 124″ Twin Cam motor with a custom stainless and titanium turbo kit. The custom aluminum wheels are inspired by the Turbofan wheels on Porsche 935 race cars of the late 70’s, and it’s one of the only Harley-Davidsons running a Haltech ECU. The hours into the project are immense, from the stunning hand-shaped aluminum fairings to the custom plumbing for the turbo to that standalone ECU, tuned for 280-320 horsepower. Says Patrick:

“I decided to use a Haltech ECU for the engine management, figuring out how to make that work on a Harley was the equivalent of building a completely separate bike.”

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Alyssa Del Valle

But those long hours paid off. The end result has to be the baddest Big Twin we’ve ever seen, a turbocharged missile wrapped in FXRT-style fairings, ready to punch through the air at high speed, whistling the death song of lesser machines. Patrick is happy with the result:

“I’m extremely proud of the whole bike; as of now I don’t think there is one thing I would change.”

A couple weeks ago, at the 2020 edition of The One Motorcycle Show, the bike earned The One Motorcycle Show Award, given by well-known motorcycle designer Ola Stenegärd (@forsaken_industries), the Director of Product Design for Indian Motorcycle. While other judges give other awards, “The One” is the most coveted trophy of the show. A hearty congratulations to Patrick and the Royal-T Racing team!

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Eddie Del Valle

Below, we get the full story on the build from Patrick himself, as well as some stunning photos from husband/wife duo Alyssa Del Valle (@alykatshoots) and Eddie Del Valle (@bearded_r0b0t). Special thanks to Dumptruck Stroupe (@dumptruck_) of Royal-T Racing for helping make the feature happen.

Landspeed Dyna: Builder Interview

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Alyssa Del Valle
• Please tell us a bit about yourself, your history with motorcycles, and your workshop.

Well my name is Patrick Tilbury. I started welding around the age of 14 just as a hobby and a way to build shit in my buddy (and now our sponsored flat track Hooligan racer) Carlos Sanchez‘s home garage. From there it snowballed into working at various performance and racecar shops in the Austin, TX area. The beginning of my career was mostly focused on building turbo setups for RX-7’s, Supras, and other imports making big power for different racing applications. From there I went on to work at the Austin Speed Shop where I was introduced to a completely different side of fabrication; high dollar, period correct hot rods and kustoms. I learned about sheet metal shaping, fit and finish, chassis fabrication, and really just what good style looks like. Jesse James had recently moved to Austin full time when I began working at the Austin Speed Shop, which he co-owns. After a few years he decided to re-open West Coast Choppers in Dripping Springs, TX. We had a few discussions and he ended up pulling me from the speed shop and having me work full-time at WCC to begin some new builds as well as help develop an updated product line.

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Alyssa Del Valle

After about 3 years at WCC I had started making and selling FXR/Dyna pipes on the side (Jesse’s idea). It quickly became too much for me to keep up with both, which is what led to the birth of Royal-T Racing. One year into running my business full-time I packed everything up, sold my house in Austin, and hauled ass to New Orleans, which is where the shop is today. The shop is located in the Upper 9th Ward of New Orleans in what was previously a speakeasy doctor’s office/emergency room. Lots of sketchy shit has gone down in this building haha.

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Alyssa Del Valle
• What’s the make, model, and year of the bike?

The bike started as a 2007 Harley-Davidson Dyna Streetbob.

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Alyssa Del Valle
• Why was this bike built?

I would say we built because we wanted to see it, if that makes sense. It is definitely a personal project that I have funded 100% out of pocket over the last 4-ish years.

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Alyssa Del Valle
• What was the design concept and what influenced the build?

My good friend Luke DiCiurcio and I came up with the idea while at Sturgis still working for WCC. I don’t remember exactly what brought it up but I know booze were involved. I think I asked Luke a question like, “Imagine if Suzuki made the Hayabusa in the 80’s, what would Harley’s competitor look like?” and that’s what we started planning to build.

• What custom work was done to the bike?

Literally everything except modifying the neck, I wanted to keep the Harley VIN. Every piece of fab work was done in-house here at Royal-T Racing, from the hand shaped aluminum fairings, to the frame and turbo setup; there is a stupid amount of hours into that bike. I decided to use a Haltech ECU for the engine management, figuring out how to make that work on a Harley was the equivalent of building a completely separate bike.

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Eddie Del Valle
• Does the bike have a nickname?

I’ve called it a few things while frustrated with it, but no official nickname. I just refer to it as the land speed bike or my race bike.

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Alyssa Del Valle
• How would you classify this bike?

Ehhh, that’s a hard one. Maybe just a Race Bike.

Harley Turbo Dyna
Photo: Eddie Del Valle
• Was there anything done during this build that you are particularly proud of?

I’m extremely proud of the whole bike; as of now I don’t think there is one thing I would change. Every part of this bike works together and it wasn’t planned out like that, it just kind of happened.

Follow the Builder

Website: www.RoyaltRacing.com
IG: @Royal.T.Racing
FB: facebook.com/royaltracing

Follow the Photographers

 

3 Comments

  1. There’s no way I’m putting a turbo under my nuts!

  2. This bike was crazy and had to be stared at for long periods. Each nook had some special element about it that made you say “holy shi-“. It was an easy choice for top bike.

  3. How do you ride it and keep from getting burned? Looks like a lot of hot hardwear to close for comfort and like Shawn said above what about your privates? Cool bike, how fast is it?

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