Yamaha XV1000 TR1 “Django” by Remastered Cycle

Yamaha TR1 Scrambler Tracker

Awoken from oblivion…

The Yamaha XV1000 TR1 was introduced in 1981, a more powerful Euro-spec version of the XV920 Virago we received here in the States. The 980cc TR1 boasted a stout 69 horsepower from the air-cooled 75-degree engine — only the second V-twin to come out of Japan since WWII, the first being the ’78 Honda CX500. If Bike magazine’s 1981 review is any indication, the big Yamaha twin made quite an impression:

“Kids on push bikes will stop and stare. Taxi drivers will hang out of their windows for a chat  ‘Is it really 1000cc, mate?’ Old gents with eyes misty for their long-gone Vincents and Zeniths will tell you it’s the bike of their dreams, son, but I don’t think I could manage the weight anymore.”

Yamaha TR1 Scrambler Tracker

Yamaha predicted only a ten-year lifespan for Virago series.  Little did they know that intrepid builders all over the world would be resurrecting, even “remastering” these V-twins forty years after their introduction.

Enter the team of Italy’s Remastered Cycle, consisting Luca, Samu, and their close client Alessandro Gallina, a real estate agent with a passion for giving “new life to now-forgotten motorcycles.” The shop is located in the Brescia area of Italy, famous for its wine and more…

“A land of engines, in which the historic Mille Miglia race was born, and where the culture of work, innovation, and creativity blend together in the constant search of good taste, with due regard for the traditions of the past.”

Yamaha TR1 Scrambler Tracker

Believe it or not, they found this 1982 TR1 in the garage of an old building near Lake Iseo, Italy, where it had stood for over twenty-five years since the death of its original owner! Samu and Luca contacted Alessandro, and together they decided to rebuild the bike into a modern scrambler / tracker:

“A Scrambler with urban connotations, which would convey power and elegance, keeping intact two essential Yamaha aesthetic traits: the V-twin engine along with the well-known XV rims…”

Yamaha TR1 Scrambler Tracker

Below, we get the full story on the build, aptly nicknamed “Django” — the Romani word meaning “I awake” — along with some stunning photos from Samu of Remastered Cycle (@samu_remasteredcycle).

Yamaha TR1 Tracker / Scrambler: Build Story

Yamaha TR1 Scrambler Tracker

Greetings from Italy! I am a real estate agent with a passion to give new life to now-forgotten motorcycles. I develop each project along the same lines — I look for rigorously used donors on the web, and then with the help of two fantastic guys, Luca and Samu from Remastered Cycle, we modify, cut, weld, build a new bike.

This motorbike was born a bit by chance, hidden away in the garage of an old building near Lake Iseo, Italy, having stood still for over 25 years since the death of its owner. It was brought back to life – so to speak – following a chance encounter between the bike’s heir and the current owner. We are in Italy, more precisely in the Brescia area, land of the Franciacorta wine, such as Bellavista and Ca’ del Bosco, but also a land of engines, in which the historic Mille Miglia race was born, and where the culture of work, innovation, and creativity blend together in the constant search of good taste, with due regard for the traditions of the past.

Everything made it surely seem like a mission: to give back to this motorbike what it deserved, after 25 years of oblivion. But who would be willing to do so? After a long search, bike owner Alessandro Gallina and Brescia-based, award-winning motorcycle customization company Remastered Cycle, whose owners are Luca Morelli and Samuele Borsarini, finally met to discuss on what to do. They both concluded that the time had come to bring back to life this 37-year-old XV1000TR1, with a lot of history behind it. The owner laid down some guidelines, and Remastered Cycle team was inspired to make the customization a reality.

Yamaha TR1 Scrambler Tracker

The goal was to transform the TR1 from a classic 80’s machine into a Scrambler with urban connotations, which would convey power and elegance, keeping intact two essential Yamaha aesthetic traits: the V-twin engine along with the well-known XV rims, and the original old license plate, which by itself is a tangible link with the past.

To achieve this, Remastered Cycle began work with a new front end, using forks and steering plates from a KTM Super Duke 990. To give a more aesthetic appearance to the front of the bike, the  front rim was replaced with a replica of the rear rim.

To mount the new front rim, the existing drum brakes were replaced with two discs and Brembo calipers from a Ducati Monster. Remastered decided to install an 80 cm Rizoma handlebar with a more bobber-ish line and a higher, Scrambler-style bend to give a more aggressive riding position. As far as the instrumentation goes, the Motogadget Motoscope was chosen to give a modern and minimal footprint at the same time. The front end was completed with Highsider indicators, Highsider mirrors, and a Highsider Skyline headlight.

Yamaha TR1 Scrambler Tracker

The exhaust consists of manifolds specially designed for this bike and the custom turnouts.  The choice of the Benelli Mojave tank guaranteed greater harmony and better proportions for the profile of the motorcycle, with the rear part of the frame shortened and raised to house the seat and a motocross-inspired tail with a LED headlight insert.

One of the most carefully reviewed elements, and often one of the more underestimated ones, is the license plate holder, made and customized with laser cutting, also featuring a mudguard made by hand to follow the profile of the rear wheel with precision and lightness.

To give a powerful and massive look, the Continental TKC80 140/80 r18 tires were installed on both the front and the back of the bike. For visual balance between the two rims, we created a 3D-printed drum and fixed it to the rear rim for a filling effect.

The color was chosen specifically to reflect the livery of Bernese mountain dogs: dull black, brown, silvery white and voilà… This is the Yamaha Django.

Follow the Owner / Builder

Builder: Remastered Cycle
Website: www.remasteredcycle.com
Instagram: @remasteredcycle
Facebook: Remastered Cycle & co.

Owner: @gallina.alessandro
Photographer @samu_remasteredcycle

 

One Comment

  1. Eric Levine

    Beautiful work and design…except the Conti TKC tires. IMO the knobby trend is over and bikes like this would benefit from a great set of Pirelli Phantoms or even road racing rain tires. I just don’t buy it as a scrambler.

    Love the detailing, especially the exhaust system and tail light….but also like how the builder kept the horn and other basic factory pieces.

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