“Leah” 1975 Honda CB125 Flat Tracker

Honda CB125 Tracker

BCKustoms builds his daughter a flat tracker inspired by Leah Tokelove…

Introduced in 1971, the Honda CB125 would remain in production well into the 1980s. The single-cylinder version had a 122-124cc air-cooled OHC engine that redlined at 9500 rpm — good fun for the lightweight rider.

Our friend Yann Le Douche of Breizh Coast Kustoms (aka BCKustoms) picked up this ’75 model back in 2011 from a garage sale. Fast forward to 2020, and his 5-year-old son decided his 11-year-old sister needed a motorcycle:

“Hey Dad, grab some wheels and an engine so we can build a bike!”
“You’ve got one, son. Who’s this one for?”
“My sister Alice doesn’t have one…”
“OK. Let’s do this.”

Honda CB125 Tracker

With Covid keeping the family locked down, Yann dug the CB125 out of the workshop and got to work. He even had the kids put down their ideas for the bike on paper like normal customers…

“I gathered their ideas, mostly about colors, and I asked them to go to bed while I was starting putting their wishes on screen. The morning after, like my customers, they had to choose from three different renderings.”

Honda CB125 Tracker

Matte metallic duck blue was chosen for the paint scheme, and Yann gave his daughter the choice of three number options, each representing a female flat track heroine: The #15 of Nichole Cheza Mees, the #52 of Shayna Texter Bauman, or the #37 of Leah Tokelove. When his daughter chose #37, arguing that she loved Leah’s pink hair, Yann contacted Leah and got a great response:

“Oh wow! Now that looks so so good and I am honored that she chose 37, how cool!”

Leah Tokelove on her hooligan flat tracker!

Yann says the bike is running 15 x 52 sprockets, so Nichole and Shayna are also represented. He hammered out his first steel bodywork for the build (back in 2012), forming the tail from a Virago tank and the right number plate from flat steel sheet. This little tracker is also running 17” supermoto wheels, L-309 Bridgestone tires, a big XR750-style exhaust and K&N air filter, and more.

Obviously, it was a big point of pride for Yann to finish off the build with the help of his kids. Since daughter has been more focused on horseback riding than motorcycles, his son has been claiming ownership of the bike:

“Soon will be tall enough to ride it! So this might be the moment for me to put back on a steel shoe and get out for laps with him.”

Below, we talk to Yann for the full story on the build!

Honda CB125 Flat Tracker: Builder Interview

Honda CB125 Tracker

• Please tell us a bit about yourself, your history with motorcycles, and your workshop.

Despite the fact that my recent builds have taken an off-road adventure path, I still love to build race bikes. After building a dozen trackers, this last one, because it’s been kindly asked, could be the last step of that workshop era. I’ve been lucky enough to build one of the nicest flat track Sportsters, with a killer engine, as well as some mid-90s 600-650cc race bikes, So-Cal Miler-looking Bonneville, and KRTT-looking Sportster street trackers. So this little engine bike, which could be possibly run by my kids, was a nice project.

This was initially a 2012 project after I built my first street tracker based on a XLR 350. So I got my wish to build trackers, long before they became the fashionable cool ride.

• What’s the make, model, and year of the bike?

This is a 1975 Honda CB125. I bought it at a garage sale in the fall of 2011, thinking already about the possibility it would give people without a motorcycle license to grab a nice looking project for local rides.

• Why was this bike built?

5:00PM, kids returning from school…

“Hey Dad, grab some wheels and an engine so we can build a bike!”
“You’ve got one, son. Who’s this one for?”
“My sister Alice doesn’t have one…”
“OK. Let’s do this.”

That was the starting point of that new story, discussing with my 5-year-old son early May last year. So, because of Covid, we decided to start with a bike that was already at the workshop. I dug up this old Honda CB125 project, initially started 7 years ago. Perfect bike for an 11-year-old girl aiming to ride on oval tracks like her daddy.

• What was the design concept and what influenced the build?

Back in 2012, I got the bike in the workshop and decided to turn it into a street tracker, inspired by the best looking Bonneville done by the So-Cal Speedshop and named “The Miler.”

“The Miler” — So-Cal Speedshop

Then came that 2020 story with the kids. Most of the work was done already and, as we decided with kids to complete the build, I asked them to put down ideas on paper so we can operate like it was a normal customer’s bike. I gathered their ideas, mostly about colors, and I asked them to go to bed while I was starting putting their wishes on screen. The morning after, like my customers, they had to choose from three different renderings.

• What custom work was done to the bike?

Initially, I wanted to keep the nice proportions of the bike’s silhouette. By 2012, I had the choice between stock steel 5-spoke wheels and some alloy 17” supermoto wheels. This second option would allow me to put some wider tires like the AMA Dunlops used in flat track. Found a set of L-309 Bridgestones, which would do the job. But with those “big” tires, I had to keep caricaturing a flat track racer on a small 125cc base. So I decided to build a big XR-looking exhaust, add a big K&N air filter, and finish the tail section as Pete Chapouris and Jimmy Shine did on that Miler project. So I hammered steel from an XV125 Virago tank for the tail and some flat steel sheet for the right number plate. To complete that job, I also had to make one of my first custom seats.

• Does the bike have a nickname?

In 2020, the colors were decided: “matte metallic duck blue.” My daughter had to choose from three different numbers of famous Flat Track racing ladies.

The #15 of Nichole Cheza Mees, the #52 of Shayna Texter Bauman, and the #37 of our European Flat Track Queen, Miss Leah Tokelove. My daughter Alice went for the 37 arguing she loved Leah’s pink hair! So I contacted Leah to ask her if, despite her new contract with Indian Motorcycles, we could do communication on a Honda project without disturbing her wonderful job around her flat track activity.

Got an “Oh wow! Now that looks so so good and I am honored that she chose 37, how cool!”

Checking out for a new chain transmission kit, I’ve just noticed that 15 x 52 was the final ratio. So we’ve also got the AMA champs onboard!

• Can you tell us what it’s like to ride this bike?

Because this remains a race bike (the full harness is still on, however), because of Covid travels restrictions, and fact I have no oval track around, this bike has just been used for advertising until now for Daytona 73 — lucky enough, the #37 in reverse matched the sponsor’s name.

• Was there anything done during this build that you are particularly proud of?

I guess there are two points to be mentioned. First is that, back in 2012, I hammered out my first motorcycle parts, which were the tail and the right number plate of this project. For a trial, I was really happy with the result.

Second, by May 2020, just to work with both my kids on a project was a father’s great pride. Although my daughter lost some of her interest in it, focused instead on horse riding, my son is now “owner of that bike,” as he says, and soon will be tall enough to ride it! So this might be the moment for me to put back on a steel shoe and get out for laps with him.

Follow the Builder

Website: www.bckustoms.com
Facebook: facebook.com/breizhcoastkustoms/
Instagram: @bckustoms

Special thanks to my sponsors:
Daytona 73: @daytona73
Motul France: #motul
Noline France, cleaning wipes: @noline.france #phoenixinnovations
Makadam Kulture, Bike & Breizh event
Dezert Point, local skate and wear shop #dezertpointshop
Le St Mathieu, Beef bar and grill Quimper
Cap Enseignes – Stickers and advertising support – Chateaulin (Fr)

 

2 Comments

  1. Lawrence of Suburbia aka RD350

    Love this … super cool!

  2. Holy Cow! I did not expect that. What a fantastic build. It may be small, but it is mighty!!!

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