The Orange Brick: BMW K100RS Custom

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

Moto Adonis transforms a BMW Flying Brick… 

Introduced in 1982, the BMW K100 earned the nickname “Flying Brick” for its unique engine layout, wherein the bike’s liquid-cooled DOHC inline-four was laid on its side in the frame — the crank on the right side of the bike, the head on the left.

“The K100RS threw BMW orthodoxy out the window with its liquid-cooled 987cc four, but toed the company line with a longitudinal crankshaft that aligned with the driveshaft to reduce the power losses typical in drivetrain layouts with several 90-degree changes of direction. With the head on the left and the crankcase on the right, routine maintenance like adjusting the valves was simplified.” –Rider

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

While sales were modest at first, the 90-hp K100 four and buttery-smooth K75 triple would help modernize the BMW Motorrad image and staunch sales losses to the Japanese.

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

In the last decade, these 80s Bricks have been making a comeback in the workshops and garages of custom builders, who’ve found them willing donors for a variety of projects — mainly modern café racers and roadsters with their brutalist engines on full display.

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

The aptly-named “Orange Brick” you see here comes from Arthur and Job of Holland’s Moto Adonis, who’ve been building wheeled contraptions of all kinds for as long as they can remember.

“Our first workshop was in a small barn in the backyard of Arthur’s house. Back then, we called ourselves the Barn Brothers. But as the years went by, we entered into a partnership and later began fully running Moto Adonis…. This was really a dream come true!”

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

This 1990 K100RS was started at another workshop, but after the owner had trouble with their work, he reached out to Moto Adonis to see if they could make it right — of course they could!

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

They undid most of the previous modifications and decided on a full-out custom build. Arthur and Job give us all the details below, but highlights include the GSX-R forks, BMW K1200RS wheels, custom subframe and rear shock setup, bespoke tank side covers and bellypan, custom logos, switchgear, and more. Then there’s the paint: pearl white, bright orange, and heavy flake!

“We as Moto Adonis are really proud of how this orange brick turned out! It looks great and rides like a dream! And most importantly: we made another customer happy with their dream bike!”

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

Below, we talk to Arthur and Job for the full story on the Orange Brick!

About Moto Adonis

We are two friends (Arthur and Job) who have been building cool stuff since childhood. Whether it has 2, 3, 4, or too many wheels, we build it. But most of all we like motorcycles! As far back as we can remember, we have been obsessed with building and creating things. It all starts with a great idea, we like to create anything that comes up to mind. Nothing is too crazy, too fast, or too complicated! 

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

After finishing two fully restored Austin Mini cars and an empty garage syndrome, we took the plunge! In 2012 we created our first real custom motorcycle. For many years, building custom motorcycles was a part-time job. But it will be fair to say we got hooked pretty good. Our first workshop was in a small barn in the backyard of Arthur’s house. Back then, we called ourselves the Barn Brothers. But as the years went by, we entered into a partnership and later began fully running Moto Adonis. With the support of our family and friends, it eventually became possible to rent a big shop space and to make our hobby our job. This was really a dream come true!

About the Bike

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

BMW K100RS 1990: The Orange Brick! 

This build started with a simple email — the question was whether we could finish a build of a custom BMW K100RS? Some modifications had been done, but the owner had some bad luck with the previous shop that started the build. So the question was if we could make it right! Of course, we can! 

An appointment was made, and the bike was brought over. On closer inspection with the customer, we decided to undo some of the previous modifications and make it a full custom build.

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

The stock wiring of the bike was a mess — we had to sort this out. A Breakout box was installed to make the new speedo, custom handlebar switches, and the new running lights and Motogadget blinkers work.

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

We also modified a GSX-R front fork to fit the bike and mounted BMW K1200RS wheels on the bike for a more modern look.

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

For the rear, we installed a custom spring setup and constructed a custom subframe to make the seat section fit the bike nice!

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

There are many more modifications done to this bike like custom logos, tank side covers, and a bellypan. But, what really makes this bike pop out in a the parking lot is off course the color! Pearl white with a bright orange and a lot of flake!

BMW K100 Cafe Tracker

We as Moto Adonis are really proud of how this orange brick turned out! It looks great and rides like a dream! And most importantly: we made another customer happy with their dream bike!

This bike has it own website: www.theorangebrick.com. Credits: Bike design by Moto Adonis. Copyright © – Moto Adonis Motorcycles b.v. Content free to share under conditions of mentioning Moto Adonis with link to social (Instagram: @moto_adonis) and website (MotoAdonis.com).

5 Comments

  1. I have nothing against customised BMW Ks; in fact, my own brother rides a customised K75, with my blessing. This example ranks among the better ones. It is just that every tenth bike on Bikebound (or Bikexif for that matter) seems to be a BMW K; can we please have them every thirty bikes, or even less often?

  2. I like this, and I typically hate “bricks”…. Except, what’s with that seat? It is somehow phallic and goofy at the same time. Fix that and it’d be a looker.

  3. BIKERS, distance riders like ME, love BMW’s, know their heritage, distance-capabilities, and indestructible powerplants. I began my mechanical training working upon aircraft, and later customizing motorcycles. Triumphs, Suzuki’s, Harley Sportsters, AND BMW R247’s. I particularly love the rear suspension design on this ‘flying brick’. I figure any “real motorcycle visionary” and rider would be positive in mind when it comes to recognizing the art of design as applied to any manufacturer’s bike by an inspired customizer. Negative comments are a give-away to many like me that ignorance must be ‘stamped out’, with time and education.

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